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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Fifteen Oklahoma tribes will split $18 million in federal grants to address issues such as substance abuse, violence against women and community policing.

The Oklahoman reports the U.S. Justice Department announced the grants Tuesday.

The Quapaw Tribe will receive the largest grant, with $3.9 million earmarked for corrections and alternative programs to incarceration. The tribe also will receive almost $450,000 to address alcohol and substance abuse and more than $230,000 for policing.

R. Trent Shores is the U.S. Attorney in Tulsa. He says reducing gangs and gun crimes is important to protect tribal communities. He says it's also important to address mental health and substance abuse issues.

The grants are a part of more than $100 million given to 125 tribes across the U.S.

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Information from: The Oklahoman, http://www.newsok.com

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OKLAHOMA CITY – One goal of Oklahoma City Indian Clinic (OKCIC), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit clinic providing services to American Indians in central Oklahoma, is to educate Oklahomans on the steps that can be taken to prevent and combat many unnecessary infant deaths.

September is Infant Mortality Awareness Month. Infant mortality is defined as the number of deaths to infants less than one year of age. Oklahoma is ranked 46th in the country for infant mortality, with 8.5 deaths per 1,000 births, compared to the national infant mortality rate of 6.7 deaths per 1,000 births. Unfortunately, Oklahoma and Native American infant mortality is higher than the national rate.

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LAS CRUCES, N.M. (AP) — The Fort Sill Apache Tribe has been awarded $800,000 from the federal government to help build a fuel station on its property in southern New Mexico.

Tribal Chairman Jeff Haozous tells the Las Cruces Sun-News that details still need to be worked out for the project at Akela Flats, but he believes it will be larger than a similar project the tribe recently started in Oklahoma.

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TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Secretary Tom Price, meet Indian Country.

As part of a three-day visit to Oklahoma, Price, the Secretary of Health and Human Services for the Trump administration, met with officials from the Cherokee and Pawnee nations, along with representatives for the cabinet’s tribal advisory council.

Along with exposure to traditional Cherokee and Pawnee songs and dances, Price was given a candid view of one of the bigger problems facing tribal communities: opioid abuse.

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