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CUBA, Mo. (AP) - A Native American tribe in Oklahoma has hired lobbyists in its bid to open a casino in Missouri.

The Osage Nation hired former Missouri House Speaker Steve Tilley on Aug. 15 to lobby on its behalf. The tribe also hired Tom Robbins and Shawn Rigger, two of Tilley's associates at Strategic Capitol Consulting Firm, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

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TULSA, Okla. (AP) — The Cherokee Nation is urging a federal judge to allow a tribal lawsuit against distributors and retailers of opioid medications to be litigated in the tribe's own court.

Cherokee Nation Attorney General Todd Hembree has filed written arguments with U.S. District Judge Terence Kern in a lawsuit that alleges the companies have contributed to "an epidemic of prescription opioid abuse" among the tribe's citizens. The lawsuit alleges that six distribution and pharmaceutical companies have created conditions in which "vast amounts of opioids have flowed freely from manufacturers to abusers and drug dealers" within the tribe's territory.

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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - School officials in Oklahoma City and Tulsa will reconsider whether their schools should bear the names of confederate generals after a white nationalist rally decrying the planned removal of a Robert E. Lee statue turned deadly in Charlottesville, Virginia.

An online petition in Tulsa urges the district to rethink a 99-year-old decision to name a school after Lee. Four elementary schools in Oklahoma City also bear the names of Lee and other Confederate generals, including Stand Watie, a Cherokee.

The Tulsa school district released a statement Monday saying officials plan to review the names of all schools in the district to assure they reflect community values.

Meanwhile, Oklahoma City school officials say changing school names can cost as much as $75,000 per school.

Three people died Saturday in Charlottesville as counter-protesters clashed with white nationalists.

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TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A former police officer facing a fourth trial for the death of his daughter's black boyfriend can't be tried in Oklahoma because the shooting happened on American Indian territory, his attorneys argued in a new court filing.

Citing his citizenship in the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, attorneys for ex-Tulsa Police Department Officer Shannon Kepler asked a judge Friday to dismiss the case because the 2014 shooting happened on land inside tribal territory. The Tulsa World reported that Kepler was issued a Creek Nation citizenship identification card on Thursday.

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