Events

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Chickasaw Princesses crowned at annual pageant

 

Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby, far left, and Lt. Governor Jefferson Keel, far right, crowned three princesses Monday, Sept. 30. The trio will serve as goodwill ambassadors for the tribe. The 2019-2020 Chickasaw Royalty includes Little Miss Chickasaw Kensey Carter, Chickasaw Junior Princess Brenlee Underwood and Chickasaw Princess Markita McCarty.

Chickasaw Nation photo by Marcy A. Gray

 

ADA, Okla. – Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby crowned three young ladies Chickasaw Royalty during the 2019-2020 Chickasaw Nation Princess Pageant, held in conjunction with the 2019 Chickasaw Nation Annual Meeting and Festival.

“We believe these exceptional young ladies will be outstanding goodwill ambassadors of the Chickasaw Nation,” said Gov. Anoatubby. “It is inspiring to see them take such great pride in our culture. We hope their time representing the Chickasaw Nation at events across the country will provide memorable learning experiences that will enrich their lives.”

Eighteen-year-old Stonewall, Oklahoma, native Markita Rose McCarty was crowned Chickasaw Princess. She is the daughter of Mark and Rose McCarty and graduated from Stonewall High School in May. She is a freshman at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma, working toward a bachelor’s degree in social work. She received a certificate of completion at Pontotoc Technology Center in Ada, before venturing to Tulsa. She hopes to complete her education at the University of Oklahoma.

Brenlee Underwood, a 12-year-old Byng Elementary sixth grade student and daughter of Brandon White Eagle, Ada, and Jerilene Underwood, Stratford, Oklahoma, was crowned Chickasaw Junior Princess. Brenlee has placed in the Native American Youth Language Fair three years and is a member of the Chickasaw Language Club. She also is a member of Chikasha Bak Bak, a Chickasaw youth stickball team.

Nine-year-old Tishomingo, Oklahoma, Elementary student Kensey Carter was crowned Little Miss Chickasaw. A fourth grade student, Kensey is active in the Chickasaw Running Club, cross-country, Chickasaw Nation Honor Club, youth stomp dance participant and is Tishomingo Lions Club’s “Little Indian Cheer.” She also is a member of the Chickasaw Youth Club Players in Progress (PIP) Team.

“I am hungry to learn about my culture and to teach others about it,” the new Chickasaw Princess said. “Preparing for the pageant is a moment I will always cherish and remember because without my Chickasaw heritage, I would only be a small-town girl.”

For her talent, Markita performed an original gospel song composed entirely in the Chickasaw language. The music was arranged by Phillip Berryhill, Chickasaw Nation choir conductor. Brenlee sang Choctaw Hymn 11 and Kensey told a traditional story of “Little Loksi.” Loksi means turtle in the Chickasaw language.

Participants of the pageant were judged on talent, poise, traditional Chickasaw dress, traditional greetings and responses to random questions.

During their one-year reign, Chickasaw Nation Princesses will take courses on language, culture and history of the Chickasaw people. In addition to serving as young ambassadors of the Chickasaw Nation, the 2019-2020 princesses will see many places, serve as role models and represent the Chickasaw people at formal functions nationally.

Winners received a crown, sash, trophy and gifts to prepare them for the upcoming year.

Chickasaw citizen and former 2017 Miss Oklahoma Triana Browne-Hearrell served as mistress of ceremonies for the pageant held at the Ada High School Activities Center. Browne-Hearrell is currently 2019 Miss Oklahoma USA.

 

The reign of a Chickasaw Princess has been a Chickasaw Nation tradition since 1963 when Ranell (James) Harry was appointed the first Chickasaw Princess.

 

2018-2019 Chickasaw Nation Princesses, Little Miss Chickasaw Jadyce Burns, Chickasaw Junior Princess LaKala Orphan and Chickasaw Princess Mikayla Hook, ended their reigns with fond memories each shared with pageant attendees. All were honored for their year of service to the Chickasaw Nation.

To watch a replay of the pageant, visit annualmeeting.chickasaw.net.

 

ADA, Okla. – Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby crowned three young ladies Chickasaw Royalty during the 2019-2020 Chickasaw Nation Princess Pageant, held in conjunction with the 2019 Chickasaw Nation Annual Meeting and Festival.

“We believe these exceptional young ladies will be outstanding goodwill ambassadors of the Chickasaw Nation,” said Gov. Anoatubby. “It is inspiring to see them take such great pride in our culture. We hope their time representing the Chickasaw Nation at events across the country will provide memorable learning experiences that will enrich their lives.”

Eighteen-year-old Stonewall, Oklahoma, native Markita Rose McCarty was crowned Chickasaw Princess. She is the daughter of Mark and Rose McCarty and graduated from Stonewall High School in May. She is a freshman at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma, working toward a bachelor’s degree in social work. She received a certificate of completion at Pontotoc Technology Center in Ada, before venturing to Tulsa. She hopes to complete her education at the University of Oklahoma.

Brenlee Underwood, a 12-year-old Byng Elementary sixth grade student and daughter of Brandon White Eagle, Ada, and Jerilene Underwood, Stratford, Oklahoma, was crowned Chickasaw Junior Princess. Brenlee has placed in the Native American Youth Language Fair three years and is a member of the Chickasaw Language Club. She also is a member of Chikasha Bak Bak, a Chickasaw youth stickball team.

Nine-year-old Tishomingo, Oklahoma, Elementary student Kensey Carter was crowned Little Miss Chickasaw. A fourth grade student, Kensey is active in the Chickasaw Running Club, cross-country, Chickasaw Nation Honor Club, youth stomp dance participant and is Tishomingo Lions Club’s “Little Indian Cheer.” She also is a member of the Chickasaw Youth Club Players in Progress (PIP) Team.

“I am hungry to learn about my culture and to teach others about it,” the new Chickasaw Princess said. “Preparing for the pageant is a moment I will always cherish and remember because without my Chickasaw heritage, I would only be a small-town girl.”

For her talent, Markita performed an original gospel song composed entirely in the Chickasaw language. The music was arranged by Phillip Berryhill, Chickasaw Nation choir conductor. Brenlee sang Choctaw Hymn 11 and Kensey told a traditional story of “Little Loksi.” Loksi means turtle in the Chickasaw language.

Participants of the pageant were judged on talent, poise, traditional Chickasaw dress, traditional greetings and responses to random questions.

During their one-year reign, Chickasaw Nation Princesses will take courses on language, culture and history of the Chickasaw people. In addition to serving as young ambassadors of the Chickasaw Nation, the 2019-2020 princesses will see many places, serve as role models and represent the Chickasaw people at formal functions nationally.

Winners received a crown, sash, trophy and gifts to prepare them for the upcoming year.

Chickasaw citizen and former 2017 Miss Oklahoma Triana Browne-Hearrell served as mistress of ceremonies for the pageant held at the Ada High School Activities Center. Browne-Hearrell is currently 2019 Miss Oklahoma USA.

 

The reign of a Chickasaw Princess has been a Chickasaw Nation tradition since 1963 when Ranell (James) Harry was appointed the first Chickasaw Princess.

 

2018-2019 Chickasaw Nation Princesses, Little Miss Chickasaw Jadyce Burns, Chickasaw Junior Princess LaKala Orphan and Chickasaw Princess Mikayla Hook, ended their reigns with fond memories each shared with pageant attendees. All were honored for their year of service to the Chickasaw Nation.

To watch a replay of the pageant, visit annualmeeting.chickasaw.net.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

 

 

ICBS Show announces key speakers for the annual event

The ICBS Show will open its 13th year in Norman with speakers from the U.S. Small Business Administration and a national government contracting legal firm.

Shawn Pensoneau, assistant administrator for the SBA’s Office of Native American Affairs, will open the event Aug. 20, followed by Matt Moriarty, partner at Koprince Law, and Robb Wong, associate administrator in the SBA Office of Government Contracting and Business Development.

ICBS Show participants will learn new strategies for doing business with all levels of government. The summit, in Norman on Aug. 20-21, will provide networking opportunities and presentations and panels featuring experts in government procurement. Businesses will be able to gather the business intelligence needed to increase their share of the government market and access government agency buyers and policy leaders, prime contractors and tribal procurement representatives seeking to expand their vendor pools.

The ICBS Show is organized each year by Oklahoma’s two procurement technical assistance centers, the Oklahoma Bid Assistance Network and Tribal Government Institute.

“The show is focused on networking,” said Carter Merkle, one of the event’s organizers. “It is valuable for businesses to meet potential buyers and competitors as they seek ways to capture more business and team with others to perform larger contracts.”

Registration is online at ICBSShow.com.

In addition to keynote sessions, participants will have the opportunity to attend breakout sessions conducted by Albert Garza, General Services Administration supervisory small business specialist; Wendy L. Clark, Oklahoma Central Purchasing vendor specialist; and Rhett Davis, SBA Region 6 small business advocate for Region 6.

The summit will also include an exhibition hall filled with businesses, tribes and government agencies talking to summit participants about the public marketplace.

For more information about the event, visit ICBSShow.com.

OBAN, Oklahoma’s PTAC, offers business counseling through 12 local technology centers across the state. OBAN locations and contact information are available at www.okbid.org. TGI is a Native American PTAC providing counseling and services to tribal enterprises and native owned companies within the service areas of the Southern Plains and Eastern Oklahoma regions of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Information regarding TGI is available at www.tgiok.com.

# # #

ICBS is a business summit designed to meet the needs of government contractors seeking new business opportunities or new partners to meet contract requirements. This procurement technical assistance center is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the Defense Logistics Agency. To learn more about ICBS visit www.ICBSshow.com.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
OKLAHOMA CITY – One by one, the names and accomplishments of 50 Indian Elders were shared with an audience of more than 800 at AARP Oklahoma’s 10th Annual Indian Elder Honors celebration at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City on Tuesday, October 2, 2018. As the distinguished honorees were announced, they stood to applause, and a medallion was presented to each honoree.


AARP State Director Sean Voskuhl said, “This event celebrates a lifetime of service from these distinguished elders who have positively impacted their community, family, tribe and nation. Whether they are well-known or exhibit quiet devotion to family and community, this year’s AARP Oklahoma Indian Elder honorees represent what is best about Native American people: love of family, dedication to culture and respect for all people.”

AARP honored teachers, veterans, artists, tribal leaders, and culture preservationists. Among this year’s 50 Indian Elder Honorees from 28 Oklahoma tribes and nations were:

About Us

Native Oklahoma is a monthly publication featuring the art, people, culture and events of Oklahoma's intertribal community.

Native Oklahoma is available for free at tribal and Oklahoma welcome centers; hotels; travel plazas and online at www.nativeoklahoma.us

Content © Native Oklahoma Magazine.

Contact Us

+1 918 409 7252
EMAIL US

NATIVE OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE

PO BOX 1151
JENKS, OK 74037